For millions of Americans, traveling on airplanes has become a necessary evil. Though we recognize the time it saves as compared to other forms of transportation—cars, boats and trains—we dread the long lines, tiny seats, poor customer service and delays. Flying requires passengers to share limited personal space with others who may also be disgruntled, loud, and potentially sick passengers. This closeness, coupled with confinement in an enclosed cabin for an extended period, can pose problems for travelers during and after flights.

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One aspect of flying that travelers often overlook is their onboard health and, in particular, dehydration. Dehydration can cause nausea, cramps, fatigue, dry skin, dizziness, diarrhea and even a weakened immune system. Because aircraft cabins are kept pressurized with dry air (low humidity), dehydration affects a disproportionate percentage of travelers on longer flights. Realizing how dehydration can adversely impact a trip, it is essential to hydrate fully before arriving at the airport and maintain a state of sufficient hydration during and after all flights.

Here are four tips for preventing dehydration:

  1. Drink Water

Scientists recommend drinking at least eight ounces of water for every hour in flight, spread in small amounts. Travel experts suggest bringing a personal bottle in a carryon bag—empty, of course, to pass TSA screenings—so passengers can easily keep track of amounts consumed. Most airports now have fountains specially designed for filling bottles with filtered water before boarding.

  1. Avoid Certain Drinks

Ingesting caffeinated and alcoholic beverages can quickly lead to dehydration. A diuretic is a food or substance which essentially flushes water from the human body through increased urination. Since alcoholic and caffeinated drinks—most colas, coffee and tea—are diuretics, an excellent alternative is an electrolyte drink. Electrolyte drinks rapidly replenish what the body loses through sweating and dehydration.

  1. Carefully Select Foods

Eating cucumbers, spinach, baby carrots, grapes and celery can assure that hydration levels are maintained. Cherries contain melatonin, a hormone which helps to regulate sleep. Yogurt with natural probiotics aids the body’s digestive routines and can guard against gastrointestinal problems while flying. Oranges and mandarins are delicious sources of vitamin C and a great way to combat dehydration and boost an immune system.

  1. Include Hydration Supplements

Always incorporate oral rehydration solutions (ORS) into a travel routine. They are portable, easy to use and packed with vital electrolytes which ensure rapid rehydration. Most importantly, ORS are safe for travelers of all ages and an important safeguard against dehydration and related side effects. A 2003 clinical study found no difference in efficacy between ORS and an invasive, expensive and time-consuming IV. Many travelers consume ORS before, during and after flights to get and remain optimally hydrated.

Since its development by Dr. Eduardo Dolhun, DripDrop has revolutionized the hydration market. While on a medical relief mission in Guatemala, Dr. Dolhun witnessing people—particularly children—dying preventable deaths due to dehydration. Because of a skilled labor shortage in this remote location, IVs could not be administered and this motivated him to create an effective, great tasting ORS that patients would drink.

About DripDrop:

DripDrop was invented to save lives under all—even the most challenging—situations. From clinics in the Third World and world-class athletes to performers on tour and local firefighters, now everyone can use electrolyte packets of DripDrop to combat dehydration and the dangers that it introduces.

For more information, visit Dripdrop.com